Sweet and Tasty Sensory Bin Your Baby Will Love

Sweet and Tasty Sensory Bin Your Baby Will Love

Inside: Edible sensory bin for your baby. This sensory play will engage object exploration and will enhance your infant's senses. 

This was Baby Will's very first sensory bin. 

Most importantly, my 11-month-old has:

  1. Eaten strawberries before. (no allergies) 
  2. Can sit upright. 
  3. Can chew small pieces.

It all began with the strawberry field.

After following my four-year-old and two-year-old up and down endless rows of strawberries, I finally had to put my 11-month-old down. He simply was too heavy!

What happened next was gigantic lightbulb of an idea! 

edible baby sensory bin

My 11-month-old felt the strawberries through his chubby fingers and continued to squish them as he tasted in between. He studied the strawberries until he was pried away. (third child problems)

I knew, that once we returned home I could make it up to him with this Edible Baby Sensory Bin.

edible baby sensory bin

According to the book, LOOSE PARTS 2, (amazon affiliate links listed below), there are 4 types of object exploration:

  1. Looking
  2. Touching 
  3. Hearing 
  4. Grasping

TAKE A CLOSER LOOK WHAT IS HAPPENING IN THIS EDIBLE SENSORY BIN FOR BABIES!

You will learn so many important ways to interact with your children from these books. In fact, you can see we shared it in our playdough post here. 

WHY are these four parts of Object Exploration Important? 

All According to Loose Parts 2:

Looking:

"Vision, and how the brain uses visual information, is a learned skill, similar to walking and talking."

Touching:

"Since our skin is one of the most sensitive parts of our body and provides much information about the world and its messages, it makes sense that young children spend so much time exploring how touch feels to their bodies."

Hearing:

"Sound inherently supports infants' and toddlers' cognitive development."

Grasping:

"Infants pick up objects using a palmer grasp, in which an object is secured in the center of their palm without the use of their thumb."

- Infants then move to the raking grasp (spreading out fingers and using the palm), to the pincer grasp (using thumb and index finger).

In order for infants and babies to progress with their grasps, they need to practice grasping objects of different sizes and textures. 

edible sensory bin for babies

TWO Supplies for this Edible Baby Sensory Bin:

(Amazon Affiliate links)

Strawberries

Get Started Today! 

Here, I placed my 11-month-old into the bin with squishy strawberries and stayed close by to make sure he did not put large pieces in his mouth

I also stood close by to take lots of pictures and watch his pure joy of being in this sweet and tasty sensory bin!  

The final and last step was straight into the kitchen sink for a wash down. 

In terms of baby days, I'm certain this one was one of his favorites! 

edible baby sensory bin

Sensory bins are a blast and so important for building the foundation for learning. See our Flower Sensory Bin and our Teamwork Sensory Bin for even more ideas! 

Have older children? 

Don't miss out on our Activity Cards located on our SHOP page! 

edible baby sensory bin

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

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