All in Fine Motor

Rethink Your Playdough

Ah, Playdough.

We've all been here, right?

Mixed colors being stuffed back into containers, texture hardening because it was left out from the night before, and little fingers forcing endless amounts of Playdough into the cracks of our kitchen table. 

"Do we really want to take out the Playdough again?" 

Consider this.

What is a childhood without Playdough?

In my opinion, it is the foundation of every young blooming mind. I am not here begging you to mix your colors. To each their own on that. But what I am asking you to do is to break out your playdough and consider integrating some every day items to the mix.

Perhaps playdough needs a makeover.

Here's how to use it to boost creativity.

Build Your Name

Here is a fun, sorting activity that will also help your preschooler better understand which letters belong in their name. 

Why Practice Name Construction with your Preschooler?

  • By Kindergarten, children will be asked to write their own name, recognizing that it must begin with a capital letter.

  • They will also be asked to recognize (and print) upper- and lower case letters.

This is a great game that you can use to work with your preschooler when recognizing the letters, and order of letters, in their name. 

Begin to practice name recognition with this DIY Name Construction Game. 

Hot Lava Game for Kids

What do you do when your children love hot lava as much as they love snacks?

You make fine motor hot lava games, of course.

My boys love hot lava.

I find that it can sneak up into our living room, and also make it’s way into the cracks of the parking lot. Hot lava seems to be everywhere. And who knew? I am thinking that hot lava and kids seem to be this unspoken language that unites them all. Apparently, it’s a thing and I am determined to run with it.

Find Your Name; A Simple Breakfast Invitation

Winner Winner Chicken Dinner! I’ve got your Breakfast Invitation secret weapon.

Kids love seeing their name. Like, loooooooooove seeing their name.

And so do we. We use our names to mark our success at workouts, sign off on an email, and to simply identify which Starbucks frappacchino is ours. We find it especially funny when it gets written incorrectly.

Names are a beautiful representation of who we are.

Let’s use names to help our children grasp a marker, identify letters, and hold their hand steady to design a circle as they find their name.

Fine Motor Game for One-Year-Olds

This toddler activity helped me multiple times this week!

I used it to prepare dinner, vacuum the living room floor, and take a shower. - You know, all normal activities that are a wee bit harder to do with someone pulling on your pant leg.

Under two-years-old can be a tricky age to entertain. They are typically in the I want to be older, yet I don’t have the momentum to play independently for long periods of time phase.

But no worries, I am happy to help.

Quick and easy toddler activities to help you make breakfast and blow dry your hair. #momlife

Light the Strand; a fun Winter Breakfast Invitation

Looking for an indoor activity this winter break?

Dot the lights is where it’s at.

We already know that dot stickers make crazy fun Breakfast Invitations.

Spider Webs crawled throughout the 7 continents on Instagram.

Christmas Trees raved on Busy Toddler.

And DIY board game helped keep us all going over Thanksgiving Break.

Bring out the dot sticker packs for the brightest Breakfast Invitation yet!

Gingerbread Man Sticker Match - a fun winter activity

Looking to introduce some key math concepts?

You know me. I am always thinking of ways to introduce those Common Core Math Standards now so when we all enter Kindergarten, it is a lot more head nodding than confusion.

I’ve been there. I’ve taught these standards. I assure you, they move FAST.

Here, I know that Kindergarteners will be asked to understand the terms match and pair. They are also asked to, directly compare two objects with a measurable attribute in common.

“You have a pair of socks. They are both the same.”

“These two stickers are alike because they both have 2 candy canes and a snowflake.”

“These objects are different because one of them roll and the other will stack. They are not the same.”

We can begin to introduce Kindergarten topics in an age appropriate way that is enjoyable.